Breaking News

FG TO SELL OFF TWO PRESIDENTIAL JETS

FG TO SELL OFF TWO PRESIDENTIAL JETS



The Federal Government has put two presidential jets up for sale in its bid to reduce the planes in the presidential fleet.

The process for the disposal of the jets has started with the advertisement for interested buyers to put forward their bid.


Two helicopters in the fleet are to be released for use by the Air Force.

This will reduce the planes in the presidential fleet to six from the current 10.

To underscore that government plans to use the proceeds to boost foreign reserves, those interested have been advised to bid in dollars.

According to an advert published in a national daily, the two aircraft to be disposed are one Falcon 7x and one Hawker 4000.

The advert also contained the aircraft highlight, performance date and images of the interior.

Those interested in the two aircraft were also asked to inspect the Falcon at the presidential wing of the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja, and the Hawker at Cessna Zurich Citation Service Centre, Zurich, Switzerland.

The directive for bids to be in dollars by the office of the National Security Adviser (NSA), which is in charge of the sale,  may mean that the government is trying to avoid the exchange rate risks presently being experienced by businesses in the country.

A committee is handling the sale, it was learnt.

In a statement, Senior Special Assistant to the President on Media and Publicity, Mallam Garba Shehu, said: “This is in line with the directive of President Muhammadu Buhari that aircraft in the Presidential air fleet be reduced to cut down on waste.

“When he campaigned to be President, the then APC candidate Muhammadu Buhari, if you recall, promised to look at the presidential air fleet with a view to cutting down on waste.

“His directive to a government committee on this assignment is that he liked to see a compact and reliable aircraft for the safe airlift of the President, the Vice President and other government officials that go on special missions. This exercise is by no means complete.”